Comcast Broadband Bundles

Comcast recently announced unilateral broadband speed increases for some customers. Customers with current 60 Mbps service today are being increased to 150 Mbps, those with 150 Mbps are moving up to 250 Mbps, and those with 250 Mbps are being bumped up to 400 Mbps or 1 Gbps depending upon their cable package.

The Houston Chronicle reported that the speed upgrades are only available to customers who have a cable package and an X1 settop box. This article has spawned a number of outraged reactions from customers and industry journalists.

This is not news, and in my experience has been a long-term practice of the company. When there is an event like this speed increase the Comcast practice percolates up to the surface again. The company has been reserving their fastest broadband speeds for customers who buy cable TV for years. When I moved to Florida five years ago Comcast would not sell me standalone broadband any faster than 20 Mbps unless I purchased a cable package.

That speed was not adequate for my family and home office and so I was corralled into buying their basic TV package in order to get 100 Mbps broadband. They wouldn’t let me buy the faster standalone broadband at any price. The cable settop box went immediately into my closet and was never plugged in. The $20 basic TV package ended up costing me over $40 per month after layering on the settop box and local programming fees. I felt like I was being extorted every time I paid my Comcast bill. I called periodically to try to drop the cable package but was always told that would mean reducing my broadband speed.

The articles I’ve read assume that this pricing structure is intended to hurt cord cutters. But when this happened to me five years ago there were very few cord cutters. I’ve always assumed that Comcast wanted to maintain cable customer counts to please Wall Street and were willing to strongarm customers to do so. I was a cable customer in terms of counting, but I never watched any of the TV I was forced to buy. I always wondered how many other people were in the same position. For the last few years Comcast has lost fewer cable customers than the other big cable companies and perhaps this one policy is a big part of the reason for that.

Today it’s easier to make the argument that this is to punish cord cutters. This policy clearly harms those who refuse to buy the company’s cable products by forcing them into the company’s smallest bandwidth data products. Last year Comcast declared that they are now a broadband company and not just a traditional cable company – but this policy challenges that assertion.

Comcast is further punishing card cutters by enforcing their data caps. Due to public outcry a few years ago they raised the monthly data limit to one terabyte. While that sounds generous, it’s a number that is not that hard to hit for a house full of cord cutters. Over time more households will hit that limit and have to pay even more money for their broadband.

This policy is a clear example of monopolist behavior. I’m positive that this policy is not invoked in those markets where Comcast is competing with a fiber overbuilder. There is no better way to identify the monopolist policies than by seeing what gets waived in competitive markets.

Unfortunately for the public there is no recourse to monopolistic behavior. The FCC has largely washed their hands of broadband regulations and is going to turn a deaf ear to issues like this. Comcast and the other big ISPs are now emboldened to implement any policies that will maximize their revenues at the expense of customers.

It’s not hard to understand some of the ramifications of this policy. My 100 Mbps connection from Comcast was costing me over $100 per month and this is both a ridiculous price and unaffordable to many homes. The scariest thing about these kinds of policies is that the cable company monopoly is strengthening as they chase out the last remnants of DSL. There will be huge numbers of markets where Comcast and the other large cable companies will be the only realistic broadband option.

I’ve noted in a few blogs that there seem to be consensus on Wall Street that the big ISPs are going to significantly increase broadband prices over the next few years. They continue to also bill outrageous rates for a cable modem and slap on hidden fees to further jack up prices. When you layer in policies like this one and data caps it’s clear that Comcast cares about profits a whole lot more than they care if households can afford broadband. I know that’s inevitable monopoly behavior, and in the ideal world the federal government would step in to stop the worst monopoly abuses.

Metering Broadband

A lot of the controversy about Comcast data caps disappeared last year when they raised the monthly threshold for data caps from 300 gigabytes to 1 terabyte. But lately I’ve been seeing folks complaining about being charged for exceeding the 1 TB data cap – so Comcast is still enforcing their data caps rules.

In order to enforce a data cap an ISP has to somehow meter the usage. It appears that in a lot of cases ISPs do a lousy job of measuring usage. Not all ISPs have data caps. The biggest ISPs that have them include Comcast, AT&T, CenturyLink for DSL, Cox and Mediacom. But even these ISPs don’t enforce data caps everywhere, like Comcast not enforcing them where they compete directly against Verizon FiOS.

Many customer home routers can measure usage and there are reports of cases where Comcast data usage measurements are massively different than what is being seen at the home. For example, there are customers who have seen big spikes in data measurement from Comcast at a time when their routers were disconnected or when power was out to the home. There are many customers who claim the Comcast readings always greatly exceed what they are seeing at their home routers.

Data caps matter because customer that exceed the caps get charged a fee. Comcast charges $10 for each 50 GB of monthly over the cap. Mediacom has the same fees, but with much smaller data caps such as a 150 GB monthly cap on customers with a 60 Mbps product.

It’s not hard to imagine homes now exceeding the Comcast data cap limit. Before I left Comcast a year ago they said that my family of three was using 600 – 700 GB per month. Since I didn’t measure my own usage I have no idea if their numbers were inflated. If my measurements were accurate it’s not hard to imagine somebody with several kids at home exceeding the 1 TB. The ISPs claim that only a small percentage of customers hit the data cap limits – but in world where data usage keep growing exponentially each year there are more homes that will hit the limit as time goes by.

What I find interesting is that there is zero regulation of the ISP data ‘meters’. Every other kind of meter that is used as a way to bill customers are regulated. Utilities selling water, electric or natural gas must use meters that are certified to be accurate. Meters on gas pumps are checked regularly for accuracy.

But there is nobody monitoring the ISPs and the way they are measuring data usage. The FCC effectively washed their hands from regulating ISPs for anything broadband when they killed Title II regulation of broadband. Theoretically the Federal Trade Commission could tackle the issue, but they are not required to do so. They regulate interactions with customers in all industries and can select the cases they want to pursue.

There are a few obvious reasons why the readings from an ISP would differ from a home, even under ideal conditions. ISPs measure usage at their network hub while a customer measurement happens at the home. There are always packets lost in the network due to interference or noise on the network, particularly with older copper and coaxial networks. The ISP would be counting all data passing through the hub as usage although many of the packets never make it to customers. But when you read some of the horror stories where homes that don’t watch video see daily readings from Comcast of over 100 GB in usage you know that there is something wrong in the way that Comcast is measuring usage. It has to be a daunting task to measure the usage directed for thousands of users simultaneously and obviously Comcast has problems in their measurement algorithms.

I’ve written about data caps before. It’s obvious that the caps are just a way for ISPs to charge more money, and it’s a gigantic amount of extra revenue if Comcast can bill $10 per month extra to only a few percent of their 23 million customers. Anybody that understand the math behind the cost of broadband understands that a $10 extra charge for 50 GB of usage is almost 100% profit. It doesn’t cost the ISP anything close to $10 for the connections for the first terabyte let alone an incrementally small additional amount. And there certainly is no cost at all if the Comcast meters are billing for phantom usage.

I don’t know that there is any fix for this. However, it’s clear that every customer being charged for exceeding data caps will switch to a new ISP at the first opportunity. The big ISPs wonder why many of their customers loathe them, and this is just one more way for a big ISP to antagonize their customers. It’s why every ISP that builds a fiber network to compete against a big cable companies understand that they will almost automatically get 30% of the market due to customers who have come to hate their cable ISP.

Convergence

Even a decade ago it was apparent that the telecom industry was headed towards convergence. By that, I mean that the various cable companies, telcos and wireless companies are expanding service lines and are starting to compete with each other in areas that were unimaginable even a few years ago.

Comcast is the best example of this. Their CEO Brian Roberts was quoted last year as saying that the company was now in all of the business lines available to it. Compare today’s Comcast with the company a decade ago. Then they were just becoming a triple play provider by adding voice to their product line-up. Since then they have added a lot more business lines.

A decade ago Comcast barely went after business customers and didn’t even own network in many business districts and industrial parks – and now they are a major provider of business services. The company recently added cellular service and it appears they are adding customers at a furious pace. They are becoming a major player in home security. The company has a thriving product line selling residential smart home services. They even started bundling home solar panels with their residential product line recently.

The company has even stepped up their traditional cable service to do better against the satellite providers. They’ve developed their own settop box that is said to be the best in the industry. And they have bought a number of the cable programmers like NBC, giving them a margin advantage over any competitor for video.

It seems to me like everybody else wants to be Comcast. Consider AT&T. A decade ago they were a traditional telco. They operated a huge copper network for residential broadband and telephone service and owned the country’s largest fiber network for providing wholesale transport and business services. They were also one of the two largest cellular companies, and with Verizon controlled the vast majority of that business.

AT&T not only added cable TV service to their product line, but they bought DirecTV and become a major video provider. They are trying hard to buy programming and content by merging with Time Warner. The company has been aggressive building fiber to large apartment complexes and has become a major player in the MDU market that used to be almost exclusively controlled by the cable incumbents. The company has also been building a lot of fiber to better compete head-to-head with Comcast and other cable companies that have faster residential broadband.

Verizon took a different path and competed head-to-head with Comcast in the northeast even a decade ago with its FiOS fiber network. The company continues to buy smaller regional fiber providers like XO to beef up its business and fiber networks. Verizon has announced that it intends to roar back into the residential market by use of small cell 5G over the next decade. And Verizon continues to thrive as a cellular carrier.

Even smaller companies like CenturyLink are looking a lot like their bigger competitors. The company had added cable to its bundle. They built fiber past almost a million passings last year to provide more robust competition for broadband speeds. And they bought Level 3 to become a major player for transport and business services.

But these big ISPs are not the only ones crossing into new product lines. Consider T-Mobile. In a move that was unthinkable even a few years ago they are making a major play to bundle video content with their cellular service – making them a direct competitor of all of the ISPs for the market segment of folks who are happy with mobile video rather than a landline connection. T-Mobile is pushing the other cellular providers to do the same.

And there are other national competitors on the horizon. For example, there are several satellite companies like SpaceX and OneWeb that are likely to compete nationally with bundles similar to the other ISPs. I also think we’ll see new competitors spring up and compete with 5G last-mile networks as that technology matures.

It’s going to be interesting to see the winners and losers over the next decade. Right now the cable companies are approaching a near monopoly in many markets for broadband. The only way these other competitors are going to survive and thrive is to chop away at Comcast and the other large cable companies. But at the same time the cable companies will be carving cellular customers. For those like me who follow the industry it’s going to be interesting to watch.

The Lack of Broadband Competition

There is one statistic from the FCC annual report on the state of broadband that I’ve been meaning to write about. There is still a massive lack of broadband competition at speeds that most households are coming to think of as broadband.

Here are the key statistics from that report:

  • 13% of all households can’t get broadband that meets the FCC’s definition of 25/3 Mbps
  • 31% of homes have access to 25/3 Mbps, but not speeds of 100 Mbps
  • 15% have access to 100 Mbps from more than one provider
  • 41% have access to 100 Mbps from only one provider

It’s the last statistic that I find astounding. The current FCC declared with this report that the state of broadband in the country is healthy and that the market is taking care of the country’s broadband needs. I’ve written number blogs about the households in the bottom 13% that have little or no broadband, but I want to look closer at the top two categories.

Households in the 15% category are in markets where there is a fiber provider in addition to the incumbent cable company. The biggest fiber provider is still Verizon FiOS, but there are numerous others building fiber like AT&T, CenturyLink, Google Fiber, smaller telcos, small fiber overbuilders and municipalities.

This means that 41% of households (51 million homes) only have one option for fast broadband – the cable company. I see numerous problems related to this huge monopoly that has been won by the big cable companies. Consider the following:

  • The US already has some of the most expensive broadband in the developed world. The high prices are directly the result of the lack of competition.
  • This lack of competition is likely the driving factor for why most of the big ISPs in the US are rated at the bottom of all US corporations in terms of customer service. We know that customer service improves in markets where is broadband competition, but the big ISPs don’t make the same effort elsewhere.
  • We also know that competition between a cable company and a smaller fiber overbuilder lowers broadband prices. For example, there are markets where competitors like Google have set the price of a gigabit connection at $70, and the cable companies generally come close to matching the lower price. But preliminary pricing from Comcast and Charter for their new gigabit products where there are no competitors will be significantly north of $100 per month.
  • Even where there are competing networks, if both networks are owned by large ISPs we see duopoly competition where the big ISPs don’t push each other on price. For example, Comcast largely is able to offer the same prices when competing against Verizon FiOS as it does in markets where there is no fiber provider.
  • Industry analysts expect the big ISPs to start raising broadband rates for various reasons. The ISPs continue to lose telephone and cable customers and the national penetration rate for broadband is nearing a market saturation point. In order to satisfy Wall Street the big ISPs will have little choice other than raising broadband prices to maintain earnings growth.

I’m sure that the households in the bottom 13% of the market that can’t get good broadband are not sympathetic to those who can only buy fast broadband from one provider. But these statistics say that 41% of the whole market are dealing with a monopoly situation for fast broadband. Telecom is supposed to be a competitive business – but for the majority of the country the competitors have never showed up. For the FCC to declare that we have a healthy broadband market astounds me when so many households are hostage to a broadband monopoly.

There is always the chance that over the next decade that fixed 5G will bring more broadband competition. My guess, however, is that at least for a few years that this is going to be a lot more competition by press release than real competition. Deploying gigabit 5G like the big ISPs are all touting is going to require a lot more fiber than we have in place today. Deploying 5G without fiber backhaul might still result in decent broadband, but it’s not going to be the robust gigabit product that the ISPs are touting. But even poorly deployed 5G networks might bring 100+ Mbps broadband to a lot more homes after the technology gets a little more mature.

Unfortunately there is also the risk that 5G might just result in a lot more duopoly competition instead of real competition. If 5G is mostly deployed by big ISPs like Verizon and AT&T there is no reason to think that they will compete on price. Our only hope for real market competition is to see multiple non-traditional ISPs who will compete on price. However, it’s so tempting for ISPs to ride the coattails of the big ISPs in terms of pricing that 5G might bring more of the same high prices rather than real competition.

The Cable Industry – 4Q 2017

It was just a year ago where there were numerous industry articles asking if cord cutting was real. There were many who thought that cord cutting would fizzle out and would not be a big deal for the cable industry. But the numbers are not from Leichtman Research Group for the end of 2017 and it shows that cord cutting is now quite real. The following numbers compare the fourth quarters of 2017 and 2016.

4Q 2017 4Q 2016 Change
Comcast 22,357,000 22,508,000 (151,000) -0.7%
DirecTV 20,458,000 21,012,000 (554,000) -2.6%
Charter 16,997,000 17,236,000 (239,000) -1.4%
Dish 11,030,000 12,025,000 (995,000) -8.3%
AT&T 3,657,000 4,281,000 (624,000) -14.6%
Cox 4,200,000 4,290,000 (90,000) -2.1%
Verizon 4,619,000 4,694,000 (75,000) -1.6%
Altice 3,405,500 3,534,500 (129,000) -3.6%
Frontier 961,000 1,145,000 (184,000) -16.1%
Mediacom 821,000 835,000 (14,000) -1.7%
Cable ONE 283,001 320,246 (37,245) -11.6%
 Total 88,788,501 91,880,746 (3,092,245) -3.4%

These companies represent roughly 95% of the entire cable market, so these numbers tell the story of the whole market. From what I can see from many of my clients, many small cable companies are likely doing even worse than the big companies.

What’s probably the most significant from these numbers to me is that the overall industry cable penetration dropped to 70% by the end of 2017, down from a high of a few years ago of 75%. There were 126.2 million households at the end of 2017, per statistica, and only 70% of them are buying traditional cable – and that number has certainly dropped more into 2018.

The rate of growth of cord cutting is increasing. In 2016 the industry lost just over 1 million customers and in one year that grew to over 3 million.

It’s not hard to see where these customer went. FierceCable reported recently that 5% (over 6 million) of US households subscribe to a vMVPD service – these are online services that carry smaller bundles of traditional cable channels like Sling TV, Playstation Vue and DirecTV Now. It’s easy to forget that just a year ago most of these services were just getting started.

It’s worth noting that AT&T overall saw only a minor drop in total cable subscribers. While AT&T and their DirecTV subsidiary lost 1.2 million customers, DirecTV now has just over 1.1 million customers. But this still has to be hurting the company since analysts all believe that the margins on the vMVPD services are much slimmer than traditional cable.

Of other note are the large percentage losses of cable customers at Dish, Frontier and Cable One.

Another way to consider these losses is on a daily basis, and the industry lost nearly 8,500 customers per calendar day during the year.

It’s obvious in looking at these number that the cable industry is now in the same kind of free fall we saw a decade ago with landline telephones. The phenomenon is widespread and 3 million cord cutters means this is every neighborhood in the country. I believe that the pace of cord cutting will continue to accelerate. It’s looked around my own neighborhood and I can’t find anybody who hasn’t either cut the cord or is thinking about doing so.

What surprises me the most is that the big cable companies are not in screaming to the Congress and the FCC to change the rules governing traditional cable. Those rules force the big channel line-ups, and the cord cutting shows that people can be happy with far less than what the programmers are selling. The cable company could be offering more of the skinny bundles offered by the vMVPDs and could retain more bundled customers.

Data Caps Again?

My prediction is that we are going to see more stringent data caps in our future. Some of the bigger ISPs have data caps today, but for the most part the caps are not onerous. But I foresee data caps being reintroduced as another way for big ISPs to improve revenues.

You might recall that Comcast tried to introduce a monthly 300 GB data cap in 2015. When customers hit that mark Comcast was going to charge $10 for every additional 50 GB of download, or $30 extra for unlimited downloading.

There was a lot of public outcry about those data caps. Comcast backed down from the plan due to pressure from the Tom Wheeler FCC. At the time the FCC probably didn’t have the authority to force Comcast to kill the data caps, but the nature of regulation is that big companies don’t go out of their way to antagonize regulators who can instead cause them trouble in other areas.

To put that Comcast data cap into perspective, in September of 2017 Cisco predicted that home downloading of video would increase 31% per year through 2021. They estimated the average household data download in 2017 was already around 130 GB per month. You might think that means that most people wouldn’t be worried about the data caps. But it’s easy to underestimate the impact of compound growth and at a 31% growth rate the average household download of 130 GB would grow to 383 gigabits by 2021 – considerably over Comcast’s propose data cap.

Even now there are a lot of households that would be over that caps. It’s likely that most cord cutters use more than 300 GB per month – and it can be argued that the Comcast’s data caps would punish those who drop their video. My daughter is off to college now and our usage has dropped, but we got a report from Comcast when she was a senior that said we used over 600 GB per month.

So what are the data caps for the largest ISPs today?

  • Charter, Altice, Verizon and Frontier have no data caps.
  • Comcast moved their data cap to 1 terabyte, with $10 for the first 50 GB and $50 monthly for unlimited download.
  • AT&T has almost the stingiest data caps. The cap on DSL is 150 GB, on U-verse is 250 GB, on 300 Mbps FTTH is 1 TB and is unlimited for a Gbps service. They charge $10 per extra 50 GB.
  • CenturyLink has a 1 TB cap on DSL and no cap on fiber.
  • Cox has a 1 TB cap with $30 for an extra 500 GB or $50 unlimited.
  • Cable One has no charge but largely forces customers who go over caps to upgrade to more expensive data plans. Their caps are stingy – the cap on a 15 Mbps DSL connection is 50 GB.
  • Mediacom has perhaps the most expensive data caps – 60 Mbps cap is 150 GB, 100 Mbps is 1 TB. But the charge for violating the cap is $10 per GB or $50 for unlimited.

Other than AT&T, Mediacom and Cable One none of the other caps sound too restrictive.

Why do I think we’ll see data caps again? All of the ISPs are looking forward just a few years and wondering where they will find the revenues to increase the demand from Wall Street for ever-increasing earnings. The biggest cable companies are still growing broadband customers, mostly by taking customers from DSL. But they understand that the US broadband market is approaching saturation – much like has happened with cellphones. Once every home that wants broadband has it, these companies are in trouble because bottom line growth for the last decade has been fueled by the growth of broadband customers and revenues.

A few big ISPs are hoping for new revenues from other sources. For instance, Comcast has already launched a cellular product and also is seeing good success with security and smart home service. But even they will be impacted when broadband sales inevitably stall – other ISPs will feel the pinch before Comcast.

ISPs only have a few ways to make more money once customer growth has stalled, with the primary one being higher rates. We saw some modest increases earlier this year in broadband rates – something that was noticeable because rates have been the same for many years. I fully expect we’ll start seeing sizable annual increases in broadband rates – which go straight to the bottom line for ISPs. The impact from broadband rate increases is major for these companies – Comcast and Charter, for example, make an extra $250 million per year from a $1 increase in broadband rates.

Imposing stricter data caps can be as good as a rate increase for an ISPs. They can justify it by saying that they are charging more only for those who use the network the most. As we see earnings pressure on these companies I can’t see them passing up such an easy way to increase earnings. In most markets the big cable companies are a near monopoly and consumers who need decent speeds have fewer alternative as each year passes.Since the FCC has now walked away from broadband regulations there will be future regulatory hindrance to the return of stricter data caps.

The Newest Battle of Copyright Infringement

For years the big ISPs have paid lip service to complaints about customers who violate copyrights by sharing content on the web for music and video. Every big ISP has had a process in place that was intended to police violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).

The owners of copyrighted materials have long complained that the ISP response to violators has been weak and ineffective. And they are right in that most ISPs notify customers that they are accused of violating copyrights, but there has been little or no consequences for violators.

However, that might now be changing due to a lawsuit that’s been in the courts for a few years. Music label BMG sued Cox Communications for not providing adequate protection of it’s copyrighted music. Recently the 4th Circuit Court, on appeal, reversed the original verdict against Cox. However, in doing so the court threw out Cox’s primary defense, which was that they were protected by the ‘safe harbor’ laws that are part of DMCA.

The safe harbor rules protect ISPs like Cox against damages from customer theft of copyrighted materials. Removing the safe harbor means that the owners of copyrighted materials can seek and win damages against ISPs if they don’t take adequate steps to protect copyrights. In the specific case against Cox, the BMG issue was that Cox didn’t do anything to deter repeat offenders.

There are apparently a lot of repeat offenders – customers who share a lot of copyrighted material – so this ruling instantly got the attention of other big ISPs. Comcast responded last week by notifying customers of a new policy for repeat offenders of copyright theft. The new policy has several progressive stages of severity:

  • Customers notified of DMCA violations might be forced to log in fresh to their broadband account, and in doing so will probably have to agree to abide by the company’s DMCA policy before getting access. Customers might also have to talk to Comcast customer service before they can log into their broadband account.
  • Customer that continue to violate DMCA policies after this first stage face termination of their broadband and all other Comcast services.

This is going to have a chilling effect on those that share copyrighted materials. A majority of people live in markets where the cable company offers the best broadband, and losing the home broadband connection is drastic. I have to assume that telcos will come up with similar policies, meaning that DSL also won’t be a refuge for anybody who continues to violate copyrights.

There has always been people who share content. The old public bulletin boards were full of copyrighted songs and pictures that could be shared. Over time this morphed into Napster and other file-sharing services. Today there are still a number of sharing sites on Tor and other places on the web. And people have figured out how to use Kodi and other technologies to capture and share copyrighted video files.

Although they don’t want to play the role of policeman, I suspect the big ISPs will be forced to at least somewhat enforce policies like the one Comcast just initiated. There has always been a big tug of war between ISPs and content owners. This new response from Comcast shows that content owners now have the upper hand. It certainly means that those who continue to share copyrighted materials will face eventually losing their broadband. In today’s world that’s a severe penalty.

Smaller ISPs need to pay attention to this and watch what the big companies are doing. I wouldn’t be surprised to see BMG or some other content owner sue a smaller ISPs to make a point that this applies to everybody – and nobody wants to be that ISP. If the big ISPs really enforce this, then small ISPs need to follow suit and figure out an effective way to police and deter repeat copyright violators.

 

Are There any Cable Companies Left?

Today I ask the question if there are really any cable companies left in the US. This was prompted by seeing an article that the Shrewsbury Electric and Cable Operations (SELCO), the municipal cable provider in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts announced to the Board of Selectmen that they are no longer a ‘cable company’. They have always been a traditional cable company in that they deliver their signals to customers over a coaxial cable network. They originally only used that network to deliver the cable product. But over the years they added telephone and broadband service, and from a customer perspective they look the same as any other triple play provider which delivers these same services over copper or fiber.

This announcement was prompted by two facts. First, the company sells broadband to more homes and businesses than it sells cable TV service. And that is due, in part, to the fact that it is seeing customers abandon cable service in favor of watching streaming video over the Internet.

Shrewsbury is not unique and most of my other small triple play clients are in this same position. SELCO is unique only in that they announced it formally, which made it into the press and onto my desk. Except for some tiny rural cable companies that only sell cable service, it’s hard to imagine that every other cable company is not in the same position. And you can’t find a telco that doesn’t sell more broadband than telephone. In fact, it’s hard to find a telco any more where more than half of the customers have a landline – only in places where the cellular coverage is terrible.

The biggest company to make this announcement was Comcast. Over a year ago CEO Brian Roberts announced that Comcast was no longer a cable company. A quarter earlier their number of broadband customers had surpassed their cable customers, and since then broadband penetration is still growing steadily while cable customers are shrinking.

And yet the industry still refers to Comcast as a cable company. We still refer to AT&T as a telco even though they are primarily a wireless company. The use of these monikers comes from the technology being used – the technology, and the vendors that support each technology are different for those operating telephone copper networks, cable company HFC (hybrid Fiber Coax) networks or fiber. Yet, from a customer perspective these different kinds of companies sell the same thing – with the differentiator being their broadband speeds.

I struggle with this as a blogger since there are a lot more similarities between Comcast and AT&T than there are differences. Calling one a telco and the other a cable company no longer makes much sense. When taking about the whole industry I usually refer to triple play providers as ISPs or carriers.

We don’t have a good short word to describe companies that use their networks to sell the triple play services, and which now also other services like security, smart home, managed WiFi, etc. The word ISP really isn’t adequate because there are plenty of companies around that only sell Internet access. Those are ISPs in the strictest sense.

And carriers is an inadequate description. That’s an old telecom phrase that was used mostly to denote the bigger companies in the traditional telephone industry. But size of company is no longer a differentiator – from a product perspective, many smaller companies today have a more robust product offering than large companies like Frontier or Windstream.

What really starts making this difficult is that a lot of smaller ISPs are abandoning or thinking about abandoning cable TV service. They are finding that they can barely buy the raw programming for the retail prices offered with the smaller satellite cable packages. Small ISPs are quickly becoming double play providers, and they won’t fit into any description that includes the triple play.

So please bear with me when you see me referring to companies in this industry with descriptors that don’t really fit what they do for a living. If any of you have a better idea of what to call these companies I’m open to suggestion.

Big ISPs Raise Broadband Prices

As the new year dawns we are starting to see big ISPs raise broadband prices. One of the more interesting increases is by Comcast. They increased two rates – the rate of standalone broadband and the price of renting a cable modem.

The company now charges $75 per month for a standalone broadband connection that meets the FCC’s definition of broadband of being at least 25/3 Mbps. In many of their markets the minimum speed offered to new customers is faster than this, making the $75 entry price for standalone broadband.

For now it doesn’t look like Comcast increased the cost of bundled broadband, although they just announced that all bundled packages are increasing by $5 per month. But that increase can largely be attributed to increased programming costs. The price for standalone broadband was $65 a year ago, was raised by $5 during 2017 and just went up by $5 again.

The standalone price increase is aimed squarely at cord cutters. This price punishes customers who don’t want to pay for the other services in the various Comcast bundles. This is their way to still extract a lot of margin from somebody who elects to watch video online. I wrote a blog a few months ago that cited a Wall Street analyst that suggested that the company ought to charge $90 for standalone broadband, and it looks like the company is heeding that advice.

To put that price into perspective, Google Fiber and a few others are charging $70 for a standalone symmetrical gigabit connection – 20 times the speed for a lower price. But to really make a fair comparison you also have to consider the Comcast cable modem. They just raised that rate from $10 to $11 per month. The company makes it a challenger for customers who won’t use the Comcast modem, and so the real standalone price for the minimal Comcast broadband product is $86 per month.  It’s not hard to understand why households are beginning to find broadband unaffordable.

The $11 fee for a cable modem is outrageous. Comcast gets these directly manufactured and I am doubtful that they are spending more than $100 per device, and probably less. The $1 price increase adds roughly $300 million to Comcast’s bottom line. In total, the company is billing roughly $3.3 billion per year for all customers for an inventory of modems that probably costed them less than $2.5 billion. And since people tend to keep the modems for a number of years, this rate is mostly margin. Even for a new customer Comcast recovers the cost of the modem within 9 months.

Frontier also has introduced a troubling new price increase for broadband. Rather than increase the advertised price of the product they are adding a $1.99 per month ‘Internet Infrastructure Surcharge.’ This is strictly an increase in broadband rates, and the company is clearly hoping that most people don’t notice or don’t understand this new charge on their bill. For the last few years we have seen cable companies sneak in rates that look like taxes or external fees but which are just a piece of the cable TV bill. It’s disturbing to see this happening with broadband and I suspect other ISPs will begin copying this concept over the next few years.

Cox has also increased data prices, and unlike the above two companies which are trying to mask the broadband price increases, Cox raised all packages that include broadband from $2 to $4 per month.

Broadband prices have never been regulated. There was a minimal threat of price regulation under Title II authority at the FCC, but that’s now gone. I’ve seen a few articles blaming these latest price increases on the end of Title II regulation, but there has never been anything stopping an ISP from raising rates other than market forces. In fact, the FCC has never threatened to regulate broadband rates.

There are two real drivers of these and future broadband price increases. First, broadband is no longer growing explosively since most homes now have a broadband connection. And the publicly traded ISPs are feeling earnings pressure while the loss of cable TV and telephone customers leaves broadband as the only place to increase bottom line margins.

The second major factor is the absence of real broadband competition. In markets where a real competitor like Google shows up the big ISPs come close to matching the lower prices of the competitor. But as houses need faster broadband, the residual competitive pressure from DSL is waning, meaning that in most cities the cable companies are becoming a virtual monopoly. Big ISPs like Comcast will lower rates where they have a good competitor, but they are more than making up for it in markets where they have the only fast broadband.

One consequence of the kind of prices that Comcast is now charging is that, over time, they will induce more competitors to enter the market. But the only real threat on the horizon for the big cable companies is point-to-multipoint 5G. It will be interesting to see if that technology can really work as touted. If 5G is successful it will be interesting to see the pricing philosophy of the ISPs offering the service. They could price low like Google Fiber or else ride the coat strings of the cable companies with higher prices.

DOJ Opposes AT&T / Time Warner Merger

The US Department of Justice filed an antitrust lawsuit against AT&T opposing the upcoming merger with Time Warner. The filing was surprising since it came so late in the merger process with the proposed merger on the table for much of 2017.

There are those saying that the DOJ objections are political, but the DOJ objections are all legitimate. Some of the major concerns of the DOJ include:

  • The merger could disadvantage AT&T rivals like Comcast and Charter by forcing them to pay hundreds of millions more for access to Time Warner programming.
  • The merger will slow the industry transition to online video through OTT and MVPD providers.
  • The vertical integration of last-mile network and programming gives AT&T the ability to create an unfair advantage over competitors.

I don’t think AT&T or anybody can dispute these objections with a straight face, and in fact, these findings are exactly what AT&T has in mind. AT&T already has major synergies between its various business lines. For example, the latest expansion of the AT&T FTTP network is largely taking advantage of fiber routes that are already in place to support the cellular network. It’s something that AT&T probably should have taken advantage of long before now. AT&T also is starting to take advantage of the synergies between its large acquired DirecTV customer base and its cellular products. It’s also the existing programming contracts of DirecTV that have enabled the successful launch of the MVPD offering DirecTV Now.

What this DOJ suit does not acknowledge is that AT&T is just trying to keep pace with Comcast. Comcast has already integrated programming with a last-mile network when the DOJ and FCC let the company buy NBC Universal in 2009. And now that Comcast is entering the cellular business I have a hard time seeing any real difference between what Comcast has today and what AT&T is trying to become with this merger.

The question that must be asked is if the DOJ is going to block the AT&T merger, then shouldn’t their next step be to ask for the divestiture of the Comcast business lines? If they are not going to pursue that, then this filing is largely political. But if the concern is monopoly abuse, as the DOJ document indicates, then they should pursue the only fully-integrated monopoly like the one that AT&T is asking to create.  In fact, Comcast has already gone far past where AT&T is headed and also bundles in smart home, security and even solar panels with other telecom services.

There is no question that Comcast, and AT&T, if they are able to complete the merger, will have a competitive advantage over any other last-mile network provider. Any other ISP that wants to offer video will have to pay significant amount of money to these two companies as part of competing with them. It can be argued that Comcast cable also has to buy the various Comcast programming – but the fact is that when calculating earnings all intercompany purchases cancel out, so whatever Comcast pays itself for programing is largely funny money. And this gives these big conglomerates an instant $5 / $10 advantage per month in costs over any rival.

It’s an interesting filing, and if the DOJ sticks to its guns this is likely to end up at the Supreme Court. My gut tells me that the courts are going to have a hard time saying no to AT&T for trying to create the same synergies that their primary rival Comcast already has.

We haven’t even seen the full power of the new Comcast bundle yet. The company has so many possible ways to tie down a customer and make it hard to break the bundle. Once Comcast has millions of cellular customers and millions of smart home customers they are going to be a fierce competitor against any newcomer. Combine this with the fact that they will soon have gigabit broadband available everywhere and they can match broadband speeds in any market (while keeping prices higher in non-competitive markets). That is the real power of the big conglomerate ISPs – the ability to compete unfairly in any one market by charging more elsewhere.

I doubt that the DOJ petition will hold up. We don’t really need another company with the same market power as Comcast – but stopping the second big conglomerate is already too late.