Finally, Speed Competition

cheetah-993774We are at the beginning of a big change in urban Internet speeds. Recently, there have been all sorts of announcements about companies upgrading speeds or wanting to build fiber in major markets.

For instance, Comcast says that they are going to upgrade all of their systems to DOCSIS 3.1 within about two years. This new CableLabs standard is going to allow them to offer far faster speeds to their customers. DOCSIS 3.1 allows a cable system to bond together empty channels to make one large data pipe and theoretically, if the networks were empty of television channels, they could offer download speeds up to 10 Gbps. But since there are still lots of cable channels on these network the more realistic maximum speeds for now will be a gigabit or maybe less depending upon the spare channels available in any given system.

Comcast has already started the process of upgrading customer speeds. For example, in much of the northeast they have upgraded customers from 25 Mbps to 75 Mbps and from 105 Mbps to 150 Mbps. They’ve announced that these same upgrades will be done in all of their systems. They’ve said in future years there will be more upgrades to go even faster.

Other cable companies are likely to follow suit. MediaCom has already made gigabit announcements. Time Warner in Austin also greatly increased speeds. Cox has announced aggressive plans for speeds. It’s likely almost all urban cable systems will be upgraded to DOCSIS 3.1 within a few years.

Meanwhile, CenturyLink has been starting the process of building fiber in most of their larger markets. It looks like they are building fiber in cities like Seattle, Portland, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Denver, Salt Lake City, and a number of other markets. They will offer speeds that vary from 40 Mbps for $30 to gigabit speeds for $80 as part of bundled packages. CenturyLink is also experimenting right now in Salt Lake City with G.Fast, testing a 100 Mbps product over copper. Between the two products the company thinks they will be able to offer faster speeds to a lot of urban and suburban customers.

And of course, Google has been rolling out fiber and can be credited with popularizing the concept of gigabit fiber. They have built or are launching in Kansas City, Austin, Atlanta, Provo, Salt Lake City, Nashville, Raleigh-Durham and now San Antonio. They have released a long list of other cities where they may go next.

Finally, there are numerous smaller companies and municipalities that are already building fiber or who have plans to build fiber.

Comcast’s new philosophy is a 180 degree turnabout from a few years ago when they said that customers didn’t need bandwidth and that they would give customers only what Comcast thought they needed. It seems now that Comcast is adopting the philosophy of unilaterally increasing speeds, even in markets where they might not have an immediate competitor on the horizon. They already have the customers and they already have the networks and they can take the wind out of the sales of a potential fiber competitor if customers in any given markets already have fast speeds at an affordable price.

I think Comcast and the other companies are smart to do this. The higher-priced data products are probably the highest margin products we have ever had in this industry. It doesn’t cost a whole lot more than a few dollars to buy the raw bandwidth needed to serve a data customer and it’s widely believed that for large companies the margins are in the 80% to 90% range. It’s a wise decision to protect these customers, and by being proactive with speeds the cable companies will make it a lot harder for other companies to take their customers. And I think they have finally begun to learn the little secret that many have already figured out – faster speeds don’t really hurt profitability and a customers with a 100 Mbps connection doesn’t use much more data than one with a 20 Mbps connection, they just download things faster.

So what we are seeing now is competition through speed rather than competition through pricing. All of the comparisons I have ever seen show that US broadband prices are significantly higher than in any other developed countries. When Google or CenturyLink enters a market with $70 to $80 gigabit they are not lowering prices, and are actually luring customers to pay more than today. It’s an interesting market when even in the most competitive markets the prices don’t really come down.

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