Is it Possible to do a Valid Phone Survey?

Telephone surveys have always been a staple of doing research in the business and political arenas. Surveys have been given to random samples of households to find out how the public as a whole feels about various topics. And surveys have been effective. The whole point of a survey is to sample a relatively small number of people and have good faith that the results of the survey represent the opinions of the public as a whole.

But there has been such a large drop in the number of households with landlines that one has to ask if it is possible to any longer do a valid telephone survey. The percentage of households with landlines has declined greatly and nationwide it is estimated to now be below 60%. We recently heard of a community in Colorado that has less than 45% of households with landlines.

The whole point of doing a survey is so that you can rely on the results to tell you something meaningful about the whole population. And there are several aspects to conducting a survey that are mandatory if the results are to be believable. In order to be valid, a survey must be delivered randomly to a sufficient proportion of the universe being sampled.

And therein lies the problem. I think it’s a valid question to ask if households who still use landlines are representative of the universe of all households. I think there is a lot of evidence that they are not representative. Telecom carriers everywhere are reporting that households that drop landlines are younger, more tech savvy and more innovative than households that keep landlines.

And so, in statistical terms, one must ask the hard question if a survey given only to households with landlines is any longer representative of the whole population. And the answer might be sometimes, based upon what is being asked. But for most of the purposes I see surveys used for, my gut tells me that landline households are no longer the same as all households.

For example, say that you wanted to ask how many people in a City wanted to get a gigabit of bandwidth. If you survey households with landlines you are most likely mostly talking to older households and households with kids. You are probably not going to be talking to younger households and tech savvy households who have a lifestyle that eschews landlines. And I think you are going to get a skewed answer that you cannot believe. One would think that a larger percentage of the landline houses would not be interested in gigabit speeds while you didn’t talk to many of the households who would be interested. And so, when you summarize your survey results you are not going to have a believable estimate of the number of people who would be interested in the gigabit speeds – which was the whole point of doing the survey.

There might be a way around this, but it is hard to pull off. If you can find a way to randomly call households in the town that includes landline and cellphone households, then you are again sampling the real universe of households. But this is a problem for several reasons:

  • If you are already in business you are allowed to call any or all of your own customers. But as soon as you try to call in an area of people who are not your customers you must follow the Do Not Call rules, which says that it is illegal to call people who have registered to not get junk calls. You can obtain lists of such people, but it adds expense and cost to the survey.
  • Then you must have access to a database that has a telephone number for everybody, and these rarely exist. Maybe some local government or utility might have such a list, but they can’t share these lists with anybody else due to privacy issues.
  • Even if you have this kind of list it is against FCC rules to call cell phones to conduct a survey. The problem is that there are still plenty of customers on fixed-minute cellular plans and a lot of surveys require 20 minutes or more. If you are going to call cell phones you are strictly breaking the rules, so the first thing you should do is to tell cell phone users they can opt out of the call. But if enough cell phone callers refuse to take the survey, then you are back to having an invalid sample.
  • You can’t solicit cell phone households to give their phone numbers for purposes of conducting a survey. As soon as you do that the sample is not random and we are back to square one.

A non-statistician might think, “As long as the results are close, I am okay with the survey not being entirely valid”. And they would be wrong. If a survey isn’t done properly, then there is no validity to the results. You do not want to make any important business decision based upon an invalid assumption. There are enough ways to fail in business and you shouldn’t add the sin of relying on false assumptions to the list of reasons why your business plan didn’t succeed.

There are other ways to do surveys such as going door-to-door, but other kinds of surveys are usually costlier and they have their own potential pitfalls. We might be soon be approaching the day when surveys are going to disappear from our lexicon of useful business tools.

CCG Number Portability

I don’t write too many blog entries that are direct sales pitches for CCG services. I will admit that many of my blogs hint at the services we offer, but the main intentions of these blogs is to plant ideas for small carriers that we have found to be useful. But this is one of those sales pitch blogs, and if you do number portability you should read it. We now offer the fullest range of number portability products in the industry and we think we have the best prices. The main benefit for small carriers is that we don’t require annual minimums, so if you don’t do a lot of ports we are going to be your best solution. We offer two different number porting products – traditional number porting and LSR service. And in a related service we now offer directory listing update service.

Service Provider LSR Number Porting Service

Before you can port a number you must determine who owns the number and get the owning carrier to release the number to you. This process is referred to in the industry as the LSR porting process. CCG offers the only turn-key LSR porting product in the country and we can interface with any carriers to complete the porting LSRs.

This is the process of notifying the owner of numbers that you are porting their numbers away and is not the same as the process of updating the NPAC database. Rather, this is coordinating the transfer of telephone numbers with the RBOCs, CLECS, cable companies, independent telephone companies or wireless companies that own the numbers. This step is something that must be done before the number port can occur. There was never a lot of need in the past for this service, but now there is such a proliferation of numbers owned by many different service providers that you can’t assume that the numbers you want to port belong to an incumbent carrier.

Product Detail. CCG does the following for each LSR Number Port:

  • CCG will determine who owns the telephone number(s). For example, while you may be trying to port a customer that is using a CLEC like Vonage or Level3, you might find that the numbers actually belong to some other CLEC. We also routinely find that businesses can have numbers that belong to multiple service providers even if they are being billed by just one.
  • CCG will obtain the needed Customer Service Record (CSR) used to verify the porting data provided by your customer and confirm the desired due date.
  • CCG will interface with the “old service provider” LSR system to request a number port. We have found that every carrier has unique LSR processing systems and we can efficiently process with any service provider.
  • We will monitor the porting process. We will troubleshoot any porting requests that are not porting properly and we will escalate as needed to meet your due date. We will notify you when the port is complete and forward you the carriers FOC. We will provide you with documentation that each port has been processed and is complete.

NPAC SOA Number Porting Service

We also now offer the traditional number porting product where we can help you change the ownership of the number in the Neustar database. This allows you to gain control of numbers that previously belonged to another LEC, CLEC or wireless provider. We offer quick turnaround to make sure that you meet your desired service cut date.

In this process you will give CCG access to your database at Neustar. But unlike some other consultants providing this service we also can get you access to the same database and the reports and troubleshooting tools at Neustar.

We can be your turn-key interface in the Neustar Number Portability Administration Center (NPAC) database. We think our prices for this service are the best in the industry. And for small carriers we have no annual minimum commitment. If you only do a few ports per year you should give us a call.

Directory Listing Update Service.

We now also offer a service to update the directory listings for new customers. These updates are very inexpensive for customers who want to keep their directory listing the same as before. But we can also handle complex directory updates.

We also will make sure that you know when the annual directories will be published and we can help you verify all of your listings for accuracy before the directory hits the street each year.

Finally, we can bundle all of these services into a turn-key package that makes it easy for you to add new customers.

Contact Terri Firestein at CCG at 301 788-6889 to learn more about these services and to get a price quote.

Regulatory Alert: FCC Acts on Numbering Issues

Seal of the United States Federal Communicatio...

Seal of the United States Federal Communications Commission. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

At today’s FCC Open Meeting the FCC approved the release of a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) and Notice of Inquiry (NOI) on expanding direct access to telephone numbers for wholly VoIP providers like Vonage.  Vonage was also granted a waiver to conduct a limited 6 month trial involving 145,000 numbers.  The Wireline Competition Bureau is responsible for reporting back to the Commission at the conclusion of the trial.

Disassociating telephone numbers from geographic locations will also be part of this NPRM and NOI.

Check back as CCG will monitor this proceeding. We will be posting the NPRM and NOI when they are released.