Retiring the Copper Networks

telephone cablesAttached is a copy of FCC Docket DA-14-1272 where Verizon is asking to discontinue copper service in the towns of Lynnfield, MA, Farmingdale, NJ, Belle Harbor, NY, Orchard Park, NY, Hummelstown, PA and Ocean View, VA. In this docket the FCC is asking for public comments before it will consider the request.

In these particular towns Verizon is claiming that almost all of the households are already served by fiber and they are seeking to move the remaining households to fiber so they can disconnect and discontinue the use of the copper networks there. And perhaps if there are only five percent of lines left on copper in these towns that might be a reasonable request by Verizon. But this does prompt me to talk about the whole idea of discontinuing older copper networks, because both Verizon and AT&T have said that they would like to eliminate most of their copper by 2020.

In the case of Verizon it’s a tall order to get rid of all copper because they still have 4.9 million customers on copper with 5.5 million customers that have been moved to fiber. AT&T has a much larger problem since they don’t use fiber to serve residential customers except in a few rare cases. But both big carriers have made it a priority to get people off copper.

Many customers are unhappy with the idea of losing their copper and many have complained that they are getting a lot of pressure from the big telcos to drop their copper. There are numerous Verizon customers who say they are contacted monthly to get off the copper and they feel like they are being harassed. There are a few different issues to consider when talking about this topic.

Not everybody that loses copper will get fiber. Of the big telcos only Verizon even owns a residential fiber network. But even the Verizon FiOS network doesn’t go everywhere and they are not expanding the fiber network to new neighborhoods. For customers that live where there is no fiber, the goal is to move them to a DSL-based service or, in the case of AT&T to cellular phones.

Interestingly when a telco moves a customer from POTs (Plain Old Telephone Service) on copper to VoIP on DSL the telco will keep using the identical old copper wires. They will have changed the technology being used from analog to digital. But more importantly in most cases they will have changed the customers from being on a regulated product to an unregulated one. And that is one of the primary thrusts to get people off POTs.

POTs service is fully covered by a slew of regulations that are aimed at protecting consumers, such as carrier-of-last-resort obligations that require telcos to connect anybody who asks for service.  But in most states those same protections don’t apply to VoIP or fiber service. The most important right that customers lose with VoIP are the capped prices, meaning that the prices for VoIP or fiber service could be raised at any time by any amount. And the carrier-of-last-resort obligations have real-life impact even for existing customers. If a customer is late paying their bill on a VoIP network, Verizon would be within their rights to refuse to connect them back to service when they pay.

There are customers who want to stay on POTs on copper for various reasons. One reason is that POTs phones are powered by the copper network and so they keep working when the power goes out. There are still parts of the country where the power goes out regularly or where there is a reasonable expectation of hurricanes or ice storms. For example, houses that still had copper could make calls for up to a week after hurricane Sandy.

Another reason to keep copper is for security and medical monitoring. The copper POTs network has always been very reliable. But it is much more common for households to lose Internet service. Once a phone is converted to VoIP, then any time the Internet is down for a customer then their security and medical monitoring services that use those phones don’t work.

The FCC is going to be flooded with requests like this one to disconnect people from POTs. Certainly the copper networks are getting old. There might be merit for disconnecting copper in towns that are almost entirely fiber and where the customer losing POTs will move to fiber. In most cases fiber seems to be as reliable as copper, although it cannot power the phones when the electricity goes out.

But it seems somewhat ludicrous for the FCC to approve shuttling people from POTs to DSL while still using the same old copper lines. That clearly is being done as way to avoid regulation and customer protections and not for the carrier to save money. And it is clearly not in the customer’s best interest to move customers from POTs to cellular.

2 thoughts on “Retiring the Copper Networks

  1. “meaning that the prices for VoIP or fiber service could be raised at any time by any amount”

    So get another VoIP provider. Any VZ subscriber can subscribe to literally thousands of VoIP providers. That’s the point of IP transition. The copper FUD factor is getting really ripe by now.

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    • But if I am elderly and only want a landline I shouldn’t have to buy Verizon DSL just to get a better or diifferent VoIP provider.

      Also, this is not what the IP transition is all about. It was started by the FCC to look at transitioning the PSTN, meaning the network between carriers. AT&T and Verizon have tried to make it all about IP to the home. They glommed onto the phrase ‘IP transition’ and want to use that as an excuse to move people from regulated to deregulated service, often still on the same old crappy copper. I don’t see any transition in that. If they wanted to replace copper with fiber then everybody would be 100% behind them.

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