The Future of Video Streaming

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I predict that we are going to see a huge shake-out in the online video market over the next few years. The field of OTT providers is already crowded. There are providers that offer some version of the programming offered on traditional cable TV like Sling TV, DirecTV Now, Playstation Vue, Hulu Plus, YouTube TV, fuboTV and Layer3 TV. There are also numerous providers with unique content like Netflix, Amazon Prime, CBS All Access, HBO Go, and more than 100 others.

The field is going to get more crowded this year. Disney is planning a Netflix competitor later this year that will include Disney’s vast library of content including unique content from Marvel, Lucasfilm, 21st Century Fox and Pixar.

AT&T also plans to offer a unique-content platform that includes the vast library of content it acquired through the merger with Time-Warner along with the content from HBO.

Apple has finally been creating unique content that it will start showing some time this year. Amazon has stepped up the creation of unique content. Comcast is planning a launch with the unique content it owns through NBC Universal and Illumination Studios.

But the biggest news is not that there will be more competitors – it’s that each of the creators of unique content is intending to only offer their content on their own platform. This is going to transform the current online landscape.

The big loser might be Netflix. While the company creates more unique content than anybody else in the industry they have benefited tremendously from outside content. I happen to watch a lot of the Marvel content and my wife sometimes refers to Netflix as the Marvel network – but that content will soon disappear from Netflix. Disney owns the Star Wars franchise. NBC Universal (Comcast) recently purchased the rights to Harry Potter. CBS owns the Star Trek franchise. AT&T owns the Game of Thrones. Amazon bought the rights to develop more Middle Earth (Lord of the Rings) content. Is Netflix going to be as attractive if they are unable to carry attractive external content in addition to their own unique content?

Each of the major content owners is aiming to capitalize on their most valuable content. For example, the industry buzz is that there are numerous new Star Trek efforts underway and that CBS All Access will become all Star Trek, all of the time. Each of these content owners is making similar plans to best monetize their content.

This looks it is going to turn into a content arms race. That means more content than ever for the viewing public. But it also means that a household that wants to watch a range of the most popular content is going to need numerous monthly subscriptions. I think 2019 is going to become the year when the monthly cost of online content starts climbing to rival the cost of traditional cable.

My family is probably fairly typical for cord cutters. We watch local channels, traditional cable networks and sports through Playstation Vue. We have subscriptions to Netflix, Amazon Prime and Hulu. During the year we add and subtract networks like ESPN Plus, CBS All Access, HBO NOW and several others. And we also buy individual TV shows and movies that aren’t included in these various platforms.

I’m not unhappy with our array of content. Each of our three family members gets to watch the content they want. We’re each free to use the devices we like and watch at times that are convenient.

The number one reason cited for cord cutting is to save money. I’m pretty certain that as a family that we already aren’t saving anything compared to what content cost us before we went online. However, saving money was not our primary reason for going online. I look forward and I suspect that we’ll probably add some of the new content this year such as Disney, so our costs are likely to keep climbing.

A few years ago there was a lot of speculation about where the industry is headed. A lot of people thought that the Amazon super-aggregator model was the future, and Amazon is doing well by reselling dozens of unique content platforms under its name brand. However, it looks like the industry is now headed in the opposite direction where each big corporate owner of unique content is going to want to extract the maximum value by selling directly to the public.

I have to wonder what this all means for the public. Will the high cost of buying numerous online packages dissuade many from cutting the cord? It’s also confusing trying to find what you want to watch with so many different sources of content that are in separate silos. It’s going to be interesting to see these industry giants battling each other for eyeballs.