Another FCC Disaster?

Anybody thinking of filing an RDOF grant needs to pay a lot of attention to the challenges being made to the $16.4 billion RDOF grant footprint. The FCC invited ISPs to notify them if there are any Census blocks where the ISP has added broadband of at least 25/3 since June 30, 2019. Even though the RDOF is covering the most remote households that supposedly don’t have even 10/1 Mbps broadband, you’d expect that some ISPs have built into the RDOF footprint over the last 9 months. However, that’s not the response that the FCC got. While there were a number of ISPs that claimed to have built into a few Census blocks, the large incumbent telcos are claiming to have built into a huge numbers of blocks since last June. Frankly, the responses of the of large telcos are not credible and the FCC needs to take a pause and challenge these results.

Here’ what the big telcos claimed:

  • AT&T claims about 1,500 Census blocks that have been upgraded to at least 25/3 since June 30, 20198.
  • Frontier claims over 16,000 Census blocks have been upgraded.
  • CenturyLink claims over 5,400 Census blocks have been upgraded.
  • Windstream claims 1,713 upgraded Census blocks.
  • Consolidated claims over 7,300 Census blocks.

To put these numbers into perspective, the Census Bureau says that the average Census block contains 40 – 45 people. Rural Census blocks often have fewer residents than urban blocks, and even if the average for these blocks is 40 people, the big telcos are asking to remove about 1/3 of the people out of consideration for RDOF grants. That number is mind-boggling. If the big telcos had been making this kind of progress in expanding 25/3 Mbps rural broadband before June 30, 2019, then we wouldn’t have a rural digital divide.

Consider the individual claims:

  • Frontier lost 235,000 broadband customers in 2019, representing 6.3% of their customer base. The company has been cash-strapped and has not been making rural capital investments. It’s fairly well understood in the industry that the company didn’t even spend much of its CAF II funding to upgrade rural customers to 10/1 Mbps. It’s inconceivable that the company that just entered bankruptcy upgraded over 16,000 Census blocks in the last 9 months.
  • Consolidated Communications is next on the list claiming upgrades in 7,300 Census blocks. The company purchased Fairpoint in July 2017 and has been actively making upgrades since then. But even for a company actively making upgrades, a claim of improvements in this many Census blocks seems hard to believe over a 9-month period that includes the winter months.
  • CenturyLink claims upgrades in 5,400 Census blocks. The company has loudly proclaimed a number of times that it is not making investments that earn ‘infrastructure returns’. It’s frankly hard to believe that they would have spent the money in rural America needed to make these upgrades.
  • Windstream is claiming over 1,700 Census blocks. The company has been flirting with bankruptcy during the last nine months and it’s reasonable to ask if they were really this active in making upgrades in the last 9 months.
  • AT&T claims over 1,500 Census blocks have been upgraded. This is the company that wants badly to get out of the rural wireline business. These upgraded Census blocks need to have come from the AT&T Fixed wireless technology. I’m not aware of AT&T having launched any mass marketing effort aimed at rural census blocks. Consider AT&T’s broadband subscriber numbers for 2019. AT&T lost a little over 300,000 broadband customers during the year. To offset that loss, AT&T claims to have added over 1 million customers on fiber. One would think it would be obvious if AT&T was also out heavily promoting the rural fixed-wireless product.

It’s easy to understand why an incumbent telephone company would make these claims. Any Census blocks that remain in the RDOF grant process are going to be overbuilt by faster technology than the rural DSL offered by these telcos. The incumbents can only remain as the monopoly provider by removing Census blocks from the RDOF footprint.

The FCC needs to investigate these claims. This is reminiscent of the overstated wireless coverage claimed last year by Verizon, T-Mobile, and Sprint that prompted the FCC to delay the rural cellular grants, now labeled as 5G Grants, for a year. It was obvious to the FCC that those wireless carriers were making the erroneous coverage claims to keep out competition. There has to be a whole lot of that going on here as well.

Remember that these claims are being made under the existing rules for the FCC’s 477 process. In the current process an ISP only has to have one customer in a Census block getting the declared speed. The easiest way for the FCC to check these numbers is to require each telco to provide the addresses of customers in each Census block that supposedly now has 25/3 Mbps broadband. The FCC could call and talk to those homes and ask them to take a speed test to see if the telco claims are even remotely plausible. I expect the lists would quickly revised and shrink if the carriers are required to get that specific.

The FCC also needs to allow Census blocks that have only a few 25/3 customers to remain in the RDOF grant. It would be a huge disservice to the other customers in these Census blocks to doom them to remain as monopoly customers for another decade.

These filings are so blatantly suspicious that the FCC has to pause, even if that means delaying the RDOF grants. Considering the hardships being experienced by everybody in these areas during the current COVID-19 crisis, the FCC cannot accept these crazy claims without challenging them. It would have been possible credible if each of these big telcos claimed a few hundred Census block upgrades – but in aggregate this filing looks like a monopoly land grab more than anything else. If these claims prove to be false the FCC needs to fine these telcos into the stone age – such fines deserve to be in the billions.

3 thoughts on “Another FCC Disaster?

  1. Note that there was an error of magnitude in the first version of this article concerning the size of a Census block. I usually let a blog sit for a few days until I check out the facts, but I was so angry at the magnitude of the changes that I tossed off a blog late at night.

    This change is still ridiculous. The big telcos are changing Census blocks that cover as much as 1/3 of the RDOF grant. This is drastically going to change what some folks were preparing to request from the grant program. This definitely has the small of land grab all over it – because there is no way that the telcos, which spend little money in rural America, upgraded almost 32,000 Census blocks since last year.

    The FCC definitely needs to investigate this and not take these last-minute changes at face value.

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  2. Right string, wrong yo-yo. Telcos and fixed wireless and cable all claiming new 25/3 Mbps service is a reason to dismiss the so-called challenge process, not delay the auction. A delay in the auction continues funding at the same levels to the large telcos, which favors those very companies you suspect of filling phony data. Let’s use the data the FCC published on March 1u and get on with building fiber networks in rural America.

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