It’s All About the Collateral

I’m often asked if a business plan is solid enough to take to the bank for financing. I disappoint a lot of folks when I tell them that, while a solid business plan is important, getting loans is all about the collateral.

Banks are not in the business of understanding your business. They don’t know how to evaluate a broadband business plan. It’s important to understand that in a given week a bank might be offered your broadband business plan, a plan to roll-out a dozen yogurt stores, a plan to combine several farms, and a plan to start a new brewery. They can’t begin to be able to understand the nuances of the many business plans they see.

It’s very easy to become too invested in your business plan. I often hear people describing their business plan as ‘can’t fail’. I can usually demonstrate that this is not so by changing a few of their key assumptions. It’s the rare broadband business plan that can’t be worsened by lowering the customer penetration rate, slowing down the speed of sales, or increasing the interest rate on debt.

Banks understand this. Every bank has a portfolio of failed projects where the bank lost a lot of their loan investment even though a project looked solid. Banks are skeptics by nature because they deal all day with prospective borrowers who are convinced that they are bringing a no-fail project. If a loan is large enough, a bank might hire an expert like me to check the assumptions in a business plan to help to identify the most sensitive variables. However, even with expert advice, a bank is still going to assume that a business can fail.

That’s why I say that the most important thing is collateral. Collateral represents the ability of the bank to recover some of their funds should a project fail. The stronger the collateral, the easier it is for banks to make the loan.

There are various types of collateral. The best collateral is a payment guarantee that kicks in even should a project be a total bust. This is the reason why municipal bonds that are backed by tax revenues can get lower interest rates. If a city builds a fiber network, a golf course, or an arena and the expected revenues don’t materialize, a tax-backed loan requires the city to raise taxes to make the bond payments.

Many new ISPs become familiar with the idea of collateral when banks ask them for a personal guarantee, meaning a borrower must pledge their home and savings as back-up for a project. That guarantee is rarely as powerful as tax-collateral, but it improves a borrower’s chance of getting the loan.

Established ISPs also face loan guarantees. If a telco wants to undertake a large new fiber project, they generally end up pledging their entire existing company to get the new loan. Communities often wonder why existing ISPs don’t expand faster, and more often than not it’s because they’ve already used up all of their collateral on existing loans. Just like with households, every business has a natural lending cap, at which no bank will loan them more.

Banks do consider other issues other than collateral. For example, a bank might consider track record when lending to an ISP that has been successful many times in the past – and that track record might lower the needed collateral. Banks love grants, but love owner equity even more since it means the owner has skin in the game.

Occasionally I see a new fiber venture that gets funded when it probably shouldn’t. There are local banks that lend to a local fiber project because they think their community needs fiber to thrive and survive. A bank in that situation is putting themselves on the line since they see their survival tied to the survival of the community.

The bottom line is that a project without collateral is not easily bankable. Unsophisticated borrowers think the numbers in their business plan tell a bank all they need to know. The truth is that the business plan is several items down the checklist for a bank, with collateral at the top of the list.

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